Top Ten Tuesday: Book Hangover Edition

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl.

This week's Top Ten Tuesday topic: 
Book Hangovers

I was considering switching up this week's topic because my first thought was: I don't ever have book hangovers. But when I mulled it over a bit I was like: not so fast. Because yeah, I've for sure had book hangovers - I've just never thought about them that way. 


For some reason I usually feel a negative connotation when I see the phrase "book hangover". As in, the book was so slow/boring/bad that it left me in a book slump. But there's also the books that were so good I have a hard time letting go of the story. When saying goodbye to the characters feels like a break-up. Or when the story was just so good or so moving or so mind-blowing that it's almost impossible to move immediately on to the next book. (The last book in a series notoriously leaves me mopey and not wanting to say goodbye.) So here are the books that, for various reasons, left me hungover.


Elsie Porter is an average twentysomething and yet what happens to her is anything but ordinary. On a rainy New Year’s Day, she heads out to pick up a pizza for one. She isn’t expecting to see anyone else in the shop, much less the adorable and charming Ben Ross. Their chemistry is instant and electric. Ben cannot even wait twenty-four hours before asking to see her again. Within weeks, the two are head over heels in love. By May, they’ve eloped.

Only nine days later, Ben is out riding his bike when he is hit by a truck and killed on impact. Elsie hears the sirens outside her apartment, but by the time she gets downstairs, he has already been whisked off to the emergency room. At the hospital, she must face Susan, the mother-in-law she has never met—and who doesn’t even know Elsie exists.
Interweaving Elsie and Ben’s charmed romance with Elsie and Susan’s healing process, Forever, Interrupted will make you laugh, make you cry, and remind you that there’s more than one way to live happily ever after.

What He Always Knew | Kandi Steiner
Left or right.
It’s that simple, and it isn’t simple at all.

If I turn left, the road will lead me back to the man I promised my life to, the one I’d imagined building a family with, the one who’s done everything in his power to get me back.

If I turn right, the road will take me to the man I loved first, the man who brought me back to life, the man who would do anything to keep me.

I knew the fork in the road was inevitable; it was the decision I never wanted to make between choices I didn't know I had.

And I love them both.

My heart is destined to exist in two equal halves — one with each man. But one half beats stronger, the vein running deepest, and holds my choice in silence long before I know it for myself.

The realization of what I have to do, of the heart I have to break, just might break mine too.

Left or right.
All I have to do is take a breath and turn.
Feyre survived Amarantha's clutches to return to the Spring Court—but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can't forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin's people.

Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms—and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future—and the future of a world cleaved in two.


The Simple Wild | K.A. Tucker
Calla Fletcher was two when her mother took her and fled the Alaskan wild, unable to handle the isolation of the extreme, rural lifestyle, leaving behind Calla’s father, Wren Fletcher, in the process. Calla never looked back, and at twenty-six, a busy life in Toronto is all she knows. But when her father reaches out to inform her that his days are numbered, Calla knows that it’s time to make the long trip back to the remote frontier town where she was born.

She braves the roaming wildlife, the odd daylight hours, the exorbitant prices, and even the occasional—dear God—outhouse, all for the chance to connect with her father: a man who, despite his many faults, she can’t help but care for. While she struggles to adjust to this new subarctic environment, Jonah—the quiet, brooding, and proud Alaskan pilot who keeps her father’s charter plane company operational—can’t imagine calling anywhere else home. And he’s clearly waiting with one hand on the throttle to fly this city girl back to where she belongs, convinced that she’s too pampered to handle the wild.

Jonah is probably right, but Calla is determined to prove him wrong. As time passes, she unexpectedly finds herself forming a bond with the burly pilot. As his undercurrent of disapproval dwindles, it’s replaced by friendship—or perhaps something deeper? But Calla is not in Alaska to stay and Jonah will never leave. It would be foolish of her to kindle a romance, to take the same path her parents tried—and failed at—years ago.

It’s a simple truth that turns out to be not so simple after all.

Etched In Bone | Anne Bishop
After a human uprising was brutally put down by the Elders—a primitive and lethal form of the Others—the few cities left under human control are far-flung. And the people within them now know to fear the no-man’s-land beyond their borders—and the darkness…

As some communities struggle to rebuild, Lakeside Courtyard has emerged relatively unscathed, though Simon Wolfgard, its wolf shifter leader, and blood prophet Meg Corbyn must work with the human pack to maintain the fragile peace. But all their efforts are threatened when Lieutenant Montgomery’s shady brother arrives, looking for a free ride and easy pickings.

With the humans on guard against one of their own, tensions rise, drawing the attention of the Elders, who are curious about the effect such an insignificant predator can have on a pack. But Meg knows the dangers, for she has seen in the cards how it will all end—with her standing beside a grave.
Two kids, Morgan and Eric, are bonded for life after being born on the same day at the same time. We meet them once a year on their shared birthday as they grow and change: as Eric figures out who he is and how he fits into the world, and as Morgan makes the difficult choice to live as her true self. Over the years, they will drift apart, come together, fight, make up, and break up—and ultimately, realize how inextricably they are a part of each other. 

Thais Fenwick was eleven-years-old when civilization fell, devastated by a virus that killed off the majority of the world’s population. For seven years, Thais and her family lived in a community of survivors deep in the heart of the Appalachian Mountains. But when her town is attacked by raiders, she and her blind sister are taken away to the East-Central Territory where she is destined to live the cruel and unjust kind of life her late mother warned her about.

Atticus Hunt is a troubled soldier in Lexington City who has spent the past seven years trying to conform to the vicious nature of men in a post-apocalyptic society. He knows that in order to survive, he must abandon his morals and his conscience and become like those he is surrounded by. But when he meets Thais, morals and conscience win out over conformity, and he risks his rank and his life to help her. They escape the city and set out together on a long and perilous journey to find safety in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Struggling to survive in a world without electricity, food, shelter, and clean water, Atticus and Thais shed their fear of growing too close, and they fall hopelessly in love. But can love survive in such dark times, or is it fated to die with them?

Think you know what it's like being a baller's girl?
You don't.
My fairy tale is upside down.
A happily never after.
I kissed the prince and he turned into a fraud.
I was a fool, and his love - fool's gold.

Now there's a new player in the game, August West.
One of the NBA's brightest stars.
Fine. Forbidden.
He wants me. I want him.
But my past, my fraudulent prince, just won't let me go.
Soon after her twenty-fifth birthday, Libby Jones returns home from work to find the letter she’s been waiting for her entire life. She rips it open with one driving thought: I am finally going to know who I am.

She soon learns not only the identity of her birth parents, but also that she is the sole inheritor of their abandoned mansion on the banks of the Thames in London’s fashionable Chelsea neighborhood, worth millions. Everything in Libby’s life is about to change. But what she can’t possibly know is that others have been waiting for this day as well—and she is on a collision course to meet them.

Twenty-five years ago, police were called to 16 Cheyne Walk with reports of a baby crying. When they arrived, they found a healthy ten-month-old happily cooing in her crib in the bedroom. Downstairs in the kitchen lay three dead bodies, all dressed in black, next to a hastily scrawled note. And the four other children reported to live at Cheyne Walk were gone.

In The Family Upstairs, the master of “bone-chilling suspense” (People) brings us the can’t-look-away story of three entangled families living in a house with the darkest of secrets.

As the daughter of a drug dealer, Wavy knows not to trust people, not even her own parents. It's safer to keep her mouth shut and stay out of sight. Struggling to raise her little brother, Donal, eight-year-old Wavy is the only responsible adult around. Obsessed with the constellations, she finds peace in the starry night sky above the fields behind her house, until one night her star gazing causes an accident. After witnessing his motorcycle wreck, she forms an unusual friendship with one of her father's thugs, Kellen, a tattooed ex-con with a heart of gold.

By the time Wavy is a teenager, her relationship with Kellen is the only tender thing in a brutal world of addicts and debauchery. When tragedy rips Wavy's family apart, a well-meaning aunt steps in, and what is beautiful to Wavy looks ugly under the scrutiny of the outside world. Kellen may not be innocent, but he is the fixed point in Wavy and Donal's chaotic universe. Instead of playing it safe, Wavy has to learn to fight for Kellen, for her brother, and for herself.


Have you read any of these books?
What book gave you a hangover?


29 comments

  1. Yeah, I have the same gut reaction to the phrase "book hangover." You came up with some good responses to the prompt, though.

    My TTT .

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  2. Yes! Book hangovers are both good and bad. I had a good one from The Simple Wild and Long Shot. I had a I don't even know what to think about this one for All the Ugly and Wonderful Things.

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    1. Yeah, the Brynn Greenwood book just shook me. That seriously stayed with me a long time. I loved the questions she raised. I've read a couple interviews with her and she brings up some powerful talking points.

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  3. Some wonderful titles. Glad you found them captivating. https://pmprescott.blogspot.com/2020/02/ttt-021820.html

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  4. A Court of Mist and Fury and Everything Under the Sun are the only ones I've read so far. Too bad I can't insert a few extra hours in the day just for reading...

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  5. The Family Upstairs is on my TBR. Glad to hear you loved it!

    Here's my list: https://speedyreadercom.wordpress.com/2020/02/18/ttt-10-books-that-gave-me-a-hangover/

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    1. I love Lisa Jewell's brand of domestic dramas/mysteries. I hope you'll love The Family Upstairs, Cindy!

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  6. Oh see - now I only took Book Hangovers as a good thing! To me, it meant being so happy after the end that I think about the characters for days/weeks and find it hard to start anything new. Long Shot would qualify.

    But now you've got me thinking about the ones that left me on a sour note and yeah a book hangover - just in a different way. Like...I hate sad or open endings and it ruins my reading for weeks at a time.

    Karen @ For What It's worth

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    1. Open endings... the bane of my existence! I don't necessarily need everything tied up with a neat little bow, but do NOT give me an open ending and expect me to draw my own conclusions. Gah! That would totally be a BAD book hangover.

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  7. That's how I feel about book hangovers too- they often make it hard for me to move on to the next book. Which, pre book blogging was maybe no big deal, but now? I feel like I'm always moving on to something else immediately, and it does become a problem. :)

    I liked Maybe In another Life by TJR, and I'm definitely a big Lisa Jewell fan now.

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    1. TJR and Lisa Jewell are so dependable. I never have to worry about being disappointed.

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  8. The Long Shot left me so emotionally drained, but in a good way. It was an incredible book. The Simple Wild was just an amazing story. I am smiling just thinking about it, and ACOMAF left me all sorts of girl power pumped. It was so good

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    1. I thought Long Shot was going to do me in. There were parts that were so hard to read/listen to. But it was incredible. It's still my favorite from Ryan.

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  9. I don't think I really get book hangovers, but there are definitely books I don't want to end, and TJR's books fall into that category!

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    1. Yes! When it comes to TJR I feel like I'm never ready for the story to end, or to say goodbye to the characters.

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  10. Book hangovers can definitely come from reading a wonderful book. It can be hard to move on after reading something that is just really special. On this list, I have only read two books, the Anne Bishop and Bryn Greenwood books. I have several others on my tbr list though.

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    1. I was so sad to say goodbye to all the residents of the Lakeside Courtyard.

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  11. I have read and adored "All the Ungly ...", ACOMAF, The Simple Wild, and Birthday! And now I want to read Forever Interrupted!

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    1. Forever, Interrupted pretty much ripped my heart out... but in a good way. LOL

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  12. I haven't read any of these books, but would love to read Long Shot. I've really enjoyed Kennedy Ryan's books in the past, so I can see how this gave you a book hangover :)

    Lindy@ A Bookish Escape

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    1. Long Shot was the first one I ever read by Kennedy Ryan and it's still my favorite. So emotional.

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  13. I definitely look at book hangovers as books I can't get out of my head or move on from. Boring/dull/slow and tedious books don't have that affect on me so I put them aside and ignore their existence.

    Everything Under The Sun was one I wanted to read when it released but I'd forgotten about. I'm adding that onto my amazon wishlist so I dont forget again! :)

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    1. Everything Under the Sun got my oh-so-rare 5 star rating. A scant handful of books a year get 5 stars from me (if even that many) but that one sure did. Jessica is still working on the follow up and I can't wait to return to those characters.

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  14. ACOMAF got me as well. I still need to read that Taylor Jenkins Reid book but it definitely sounds like a recipe for a book hangover.

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    1. TJR's Forever, Interrupted was quite the tearjerker.

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  15. I have Everything Under the Sun on my kindle, but I heard there was going to be a second book. So I've been waiting to read it, so I can binge them together. I haven't seen a release date but here's hoping you love the next one as much as the first!
    Jen @ Star-Crossed Book Blog

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    1. I *loved* Everything Under the Sun. I know Jessica has been working on the follow-up for quite a while now but she's been going through a rough time. Not sure when it will be complete or released.

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